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Posts Tagged ‘bluebirds’

On my Bluebird Trail, I have 6 house; 3 occupied, five hatchlings each. I believe they are about 4-5 days from fledging. The male and female are making hourly flights at 4-5 minute intervals; then a pause for 20-30 minutes; then feed again for an hour. also, it is early enough in the spring for a 2nd brood; they will likely change houses. Carolina Chickadees used 2 of the 6 houses too.

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I added one new Bluebird House (and retired one) to my trail this spring. The Bluebirds started checking out the new house today in the stages to breeding; the wing wave. The male found the house and brought the female to it. She looked it over real thoroughly (inside and out); then the wing wave that signals mating is near and nest building will happen that same day (the new treated post is straight, camera crooked), Taken from 150′ with a Canon 50D and an EF400L f/5.6:

 

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My guess is they have not gone any further south yet, this year. We have many days of very cold weather coming later this week (low 5-10F and highs 25F), so they may need to move on. They are shaped much like Bluebirds (also Thrushes). The bluebirds spend every winter here in the Boston Mountains. Included is a Bluebird picture from yesterday near a canebrake.

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Yesterday was a beautiful day to sit outside. Temperatures in the 70s all day, some sun, more clouds but a NE breeze of 5-10 MPH all days and humidities way down. I did all my chores alone and did not break a sweat. After finishing moving a large pile of chat used for walkways (we cannot get river gravel here because it is not legal to remove it from the local rivers; thankfully), I sat on the partially finished deck and watched the bluebirds bathe; the best I could count was 25 spread across 3 baths. They are a joy to watch and have been bathing together since late June. They are very wary as a group – with many eyes; so I took these photos from inside through a glass window with a Canon 50D and an EF400L 5.6 Lens at ISO 1600.

I must change and freshen the water daily, or their not interested. The adults bathe first and the the older fledglings and finally those from Brood 3. Id say the fledglings are pretty much “on their own” now.

 

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The tree I am speaking of is OLD and large Red Mulberry and has a good bunch of squaw-wood (dead wood) at the bottom. Next to it, is a young Black Locust and a very large dead Elm. When the mulberries ripen in May. Some years earlier than others. I was astounded how may species of birds come to eat the fruit on this tree.

I spent an entire morning in May in a camp shirt and dark green hat on, about 40-50 feet from this Mulberry Tree with a hand-held Canon 50D with a Canon EF400L f/5.6 Lens snapping photos left and right on this amazing tree’s visitors.

Here are a few:

 

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