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Posts Tagged ‘juvenile’

Using my favorite lens, a Canon EF300L IS f/2.8 with a 1.4X Extender on a Canon 7D, I got this photo of two Bald Eagles (juveniles; about 2-4 years old is my guess) from 200 yards on the Little Buffalo River yesterday. My best guess is the eagle on the left is a female. Next year they will probably have white heads and tails.

 

 

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Two young Bald Eagles swept in over the Little Buffalo this morning before the sun came out (they may be 2-5 years old); pictures are of gliding, landing, and balancing, then later the two (male and female together). The male is the smaller bird. Taken with a Canon 7D and a Canon EF 300L IS 2.8 Lens with a Canon 1.4X TC:

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The pair of juvenile male Pileated Woodpeckers in the woods behind my place, went for a training trip with Dad today. The two fledglings are both males, the third, a female, hangs out with her Mom all day. These babies were born in a second re-nest after a storm toppled their trees in late-June. The parents were brave and successful and the juveniles look healthy and strong; and none too soon. Warning, the photos are blurry from and incorrect shutter speed setting of 1/60th second – I was very angry with myself, used a Canon 50D set at f/11 and a Canon EF400L f/5.6 in low light with an ISO of 200 (bad planning) !!!!

 

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Oh what color !!! Drinking from Shop Creek near Parthenon Arkansas; Canon 1DS with a Canon EF300L IS f/2.8 at ISO 100::

 

American Robin 9/8/2014

American Robin 9/8/2014

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About a month old now, and their tail almost fully grown, these baby ruby throats are now feeding at flowers; honey-suckle, and Butterfly bushes, Petunias, and very soon Lobelia. They spent much of their feeding time at the feeders — until this week. The feeders are full and still have 20-30 hummingbirds at any time, mostly adults, but I have noticed a change in the juveniles, honing their nectar feeding skills at succulent flowers. They will be leaving in less than a month and I believe this will be a necessary skill for their long migrations. This bird is a juvenile Male and has (not viewable in photo) 2-3 red spots on the left side of his throat. He has also chased adult males away from the bush on may occasions; establishing dominance. I took these with the Giant Swallowtail photos I took yesterday.  Sorry, I did not have great light in this photo as it was taken a 1/2500th of a second, with a Canon 70D and a Canon EF300L f 2.8 IS lens:

 

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Just a few photos of a cute young Tufted Titmouse giving me the business !

 

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By my very patient good friend Janice using her Canon T2 and a EF400mm  f/5.6L Lens at  1/3000th of a second. They are snatching gnats out of the air with their long sticky tongues. Gnats make up 60-65% of the juveniles diet in the summer after they are fledged (maybe 2 weeks ago), and the rest is nectar which makes up 35-40%. They need copious amounts of protein to continue their feather growth before migration south:

 

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