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Posts Tagged ‘Steel Creek’

I drove down to Steel Creek today (2/13) and saw a small group of deer (mostly does) and a herd of Elk with the Bull watching his harem. Two of the largest does were sparring (boxing while standing on hind legs). They do this a lots in the spring long before dropping fawns to claim a grazing territory. Its’ mostly pointless, but it is a strong instinct:

 

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There were long icicles around and about Roark Bluff at Steel Creek today and water was still high enough to float today. The ice in the sickles appeared aqua-blue in the late light today or maybe it was minerals.  The temperature started at 15F at 6:30 AM but rose to 50F by 2 PM; beautiful day in the mountains:

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and a juvenile hawk warming today near Ponca:

 

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Steel Creek Photos one year ago tomorrow

Steel Creek Photos one year ago tomorrow

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Highly Saturated due the cloudy skies and late hour colors have advanced a good deal in 3 days; the Buffalo River below Bee Bluff, Roark Bluff with with tall sweet gums in front, the drive to Steel Creek:

 

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Some in this series are HDR’s; notice the 200′ high Roark Bluff and the coloring sweet gums in front:

 

Drive down to Steel Creek

Drive down to Steel Creek

Bluff below Bee Bluff

Bluff below Bee Bluff (HDR)

Buffalo River

Buffalo River (HDR)

Roark Bluff (HDR)

Roark Bluff (HDR)

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During the 1960’s and until the later-1970s a duple of rock about a mile below Ponca and above Roark Bluff gave problems to canoeists of the day. Even though the Buffalo River is rated as a Class 1 and occasionally Class 2 River, these rocks caused problems for about 50% of the canoeists. The issue was a large rock in the middle of the river which forced canoeists to the right into a rocky bank. Experienced canoeists had little problem going to the left of the whole obstruction. Going between rocks was also possible but required good ferrying and stopping skills.

During the floods of the late 1970s to the mid-1980’s the rocks where moved and buried by the flooding waters; and there is no longer a narrowed passage. Photos follow from the mid-1970’s:

 

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