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Posts Tagged ‘warblers’

The tree I am speaking of is OLD and large Red Mulberry and has a good bunch of squaw-wood (dead wood) at the bottom. Next to it, is a young Black Locust and a very large dead Elm. When the mulberries ripen in May. Some years earlier than others. I was astounded how may species of birds come to eat the fruit on this tree.

I spent an entire morning in May in a camp shirt and dark green hat on, about 40-50 feet from this Mulberry Tree with a hand-held Canon 50D with a Canon EF400L f/5.6 Lens snapping photos left and right on this amazing tree’s visitors.

Here are a few:

 

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Two words I’d use to describe this spring 2014 here in Newton County, Arkansas, are RAIN and WARBLERS. Last night, June 20th, at 6 PM we got  3.10 inches of rain in 1 and 1/2 hours. Then more rain later in the evening. April, May, and June were all  wetter than normal.

Also, I started photographing Warblers in early April and have had to stop because of my injury. There is a real advantage with these ever moving birds before leaf out here in Arkansas. In April and May the male warbler typically sings from his favorite branch, and is easier to spot without leaves. Later in June when nesting is underway, the singing is way less and I have to rely on finding nests; a insect and arachnid laden experience.

The following are warblers that I photographed this spring. How many can you name ?

 

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Drove over to Boxley on Monday and spent an hour at the mill pond. Watched ducks, catbirds, red-winged blackbirds, Vireos, and a few warblers including Common Yellow Throated, and Louisiana waterthrushes. It was nice an cool, after the thundershowers. The mill pond is full of grass and the rains of the week (3 inches) have added needed water to it. I was thinking how much Common Yellowthroats and Carolina Wrens are the same. They both spend their time along brushy fencerows; both seems to be on a constant hunt for spiders and other flying insects, they are nearly the same size; and their song is much the same. Both species are curious and will come to see “whats up” when you stop near them. The big difference is their appearance ! The photos below were taken Monday morning with a Canon 50D and a 400mm lens; handheld.

 

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I was lucky enough to get a look at a pair of warblers nest building on Monday this week. They were in a Little Buffalo River bottoms; I had my Canon 400mm DO IS lens on my Canon 7D; they were both curious about my whistle and came faily close to me. The Male has a black mask like a raccoon:

 

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